TOMB
       
     
 "I love how latex transforms the human body into a living sculpture. It smoothes and shines over the details, when you wear it you become a simplified form, like a character in a comic strip. It’s empowering to wear, you feel both constricted by its tightness while having complete freedom of movement because of its flexibility. When I saw latex vacuum equipment that’s freely available on the market it struck me how similar the aesthetic was to the stone friezes in at the V&A and British Museum. While wandering around these museums, passing through many different civilizations separated by hundred and thousands of years I was struck by the universal need to represent the human form in one way or another. I wanted to join in and do my own version but instead of trying to make something that’s permanent I wanted to make a living sculpture. The form of Trajan’s Column in the V&A’s cast courts particularly inspired me to make something that could be walked around and even inside.  When I found out I could make an airtight latex piece and create the vacuum with my own breathing this added another element to the work. As well as being about the body as a visual object the work became about it as a functioning motor and pushing it to the extreme. A lifetime of having asthma had prepared me for this, struggling and having to work hard to get enough air meant I was used to this kind of endurance. To make an airless environment with my own lungs is somehow empowering.     When you are vacuumed in latex it's like entering into another world, perception of time and space changes. We (the performers) are separated from the audience by only a thin layer of latex but I aim to create the feeling of two different dimensions revealing themselves to one another."   Adam Electric, TOMB, SPILL Festival of Performance 2015, produced by Pacitti Company. Photo by Guido Mencari
       
     
       
     
TOMB
       
     
TOMB

A PERFORMANCE / INSTALLATION OF LATEX, BREATH AND BODY

This performance / installation piece explores the machinery of the human body through mythology and fetishism. Multiple performers are encased in an airtight latex column; Adam creates a vacuum with his own breathing, forming a three-dimensional frieze. The human forms are dehumanised as the latex is sucked tightly around them turning them into living sculptures.

Supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts council England. Part of the SPILL Showcase supported by the Jerwood Charitable Foundation

Adam Electric, TOMB, SPILL Festival of Performance 2015, produced by Pacitti Company. Photo by Guido Mencari

http://spillfestival.com/show/tomb/

 "I love how latex transforms the human body into a living sculpture. It smoothes and shines over the details, when you wear it you become a simplified form, like a character in a comic strip. It’s empowering to wear, you feel both constricted by its tightness while having complete freedom of movement because of its flexibility. When I saw latex vacuum equipment that’s freely available on the market it struck me how similar the aesthetic was to the stone friezes in at the V&A and British Museum. While wandering around these museums, passing through many different civilizations separated by hundred and thousands of years I was struck by the universal need to represent the human form in one way or another. I wanted to join in and do my own version but instead of trying to make something that’s permanent I wanted to make a living sculpture. The form of Trajan’s Column in the V&A’s cast courts particularly inspired me to make something that could be walked around and even inside.  When I found out I could make an airtight latex piece and create the vacuum with my own breathing this added another element to the work. As well as being about the body as a visual object the work became about it as a functioning motor and pushing it to the extreme. A lifetime of having asthma had prepared me for this, struggling and having to work hard to get enough air meant I was used to this kind of endurance. To make an airless environment with my own lungs is somehow empowering.     When you are vacuumed in latex it's like entering into another world, perception of time and space changes. We (the performers) are separated from the audience by only a thin layer of latex but I aim to create the feeling of two different dimensions revealing themselves to one another."   Adam Electric, TOMB, SPILL Festival of Performance 2015, produced by Pacitti Company. Photo by Guido Mencari
       
     

"I love how latex transforms the human body into a living sculpture. It smoothes and shines over the details, when you wear it you become a simplified form, like a character in a comic strip. It’s empowering to wear, you feel both constricted by its tightness while having complete freedom of movement because of its flexibility. When I saw latex vacuum equipment that’s freely available on the market it struck me how similar the aesthetic was to the stone friezes in at the V&A and British Museum. While wandering around these museums, passing through many different civilizations separated by hundred and thousands of years I was struck by the universal need to represent the human form in one way or another. I wanted to join in and do my own version but instead of trying to make something that’s permanent I wanted to make a living sculpture. The form of Trajan’s Column in the V&A’s cast courts particularly inspired me to make something that could be walked around and even inside.

When I found out I could make an airtight latex piece and create the vacuum with my own breathing this added another element to the work. As well as being about the body as a visual object the work became about it as a functioning motor and pushing it to the extreme. A lifetime of having asthma had prepared me for this, struggling and having to work hard to get enough air meant I was used to this kind of endurance. To make an airless environment with my own lungs is somehow empowering.  

When you are vacuumed in latex it's like entering into another world, perception of time and space changes. We (the performers) are separated from the audience by only a thin layer of latex but I aim to create the feeling of two different dimensions revealing themselves to one another."

Adam Electric, TOMB, SPILL Festival of Performance 2015, produced by Pacitti Company. Photo by Guido Mencari

       
     

Documentaion at SPILL Festival of Performance 2015, filmed by Ana de Matos, Chameleoneye Films

SPILL WRITING: Spill Geist: Breathless, imprisoned bodies

Over the past few days we have amassed memories from and onto bodies (and it’s Remembrance Day, and with all its complex politics, it acts as a frame, a gesturing echo). And amongst these, we’ve encountered condemned bodies, imprisoned bodies, narrative and subversive bodies. And today, when we begin with bodies encased in latex and end with a burning body, we consider our own relationships to structures and frames, to mediation and engagement.

I think of the confrontation with breath in Adam Electric’s The Tomb, the outlines of bodies in latex, sculptural and liminal (from womb to tomb). The uncomfortable encounter with this sealed, exhibited space of the other (in equal measure controlled and loose, living and dead), which both enacts and blocks affect (who are we, hearing this body and its cries, this dramaturgy of life and death and narratives of breath). The breath and voice become the poetics through which the confrontation is staged, as we consider the pause, the interruption, the being in between. This is a spectacle of struggle: in order for the vacuum to be maintained, breath needs to flow outwards and as it does, our relationship to the bodies changes.

The Tomb is both monument and sculpture; it is made by and through breath, which provides our own space of confrontation. I am confronted with suffocation (and its embodiment), with working through the body, with agency and invisibility, with these outlines that are constantly abstracted by the material, with their own howls and calls for response. (And I think of processes of life and death, of communication and shared languages).

The ballad of resurrection, the liminal space of the breathless body, the prosecuted body and the imprisoned body.

- Diana

Original writing : http://spillfestival.com/spill-geist-breathless-imprisoned-bodies/